AIHT Sagam and McMaster University Launch Online CPD Platform for Kenyan Doctors

Posted by on Sep 22, 2018 in AIHT, Events, Partners, Recent News | 0 comments

AIHT and KMPDB banners stand proudly before the start of the launch.

On any graduation day, graduates are made to believe that all of them have the same level of knowledge and skills. Soon after, however there is a rapid divergence and you may be lagging far behind your graduating class, even your best friend.

Dr. Walter Obita and Mr. Isaiah Opondo prepare for the launch.

Dr. George Rae (Kenya Association of Private Hospitals and Kenya Medical Association) speaks with Dr. Andrew Were (Kenya Medical Practitioners and Dentists Board)

CPD is important because it ensures you are competent in your profession. It is a continuous process, throughout your professional carrier.  The ultimate outcome of a well-executed and effective CPD is to safeguard the PUBLIC, the EMPLOYER, the PROFFESSION, the PROFESSIONAL and his carrier.

“We are planning to expand this platform to other carders – Dr. Khama Rogo (founder of Sagam Community Hospital and the co-founder of the African Institute for Health Transformation)

Dr. Daniel Yumbya (CEO of the Kenya Medical Practitioners and Dentists Board) and Dr. Jackie Kitilu (Chair of the Kenya Medical Association)


CPD can be mandated by law or regulation but, at the core, it is a personal responsibility of every professional to maintain optimum levels of current knowledge and skills that enable them to deliver the highest quality of services, that safeguards the public and meets the expectations of clients and requirements of the profession.

“This is transformational – Dr. Kitilu noted in her remarks.

CPD should be engaging and fun to do. CPD must be relevant.

“We are committed to enhancing CPD for all doctors” – Dr. Daniel Yumbya (CEO of the Kenya Medical Practitioners and Dentists Board)

That is why the African Institute for Health Transformation at SCH (AIHTSagam), in collaboration with Machealth, the Division of E-Learning Innovation at McMaster University and Kenya Medical Practitioners and Dentists Board (KMPDB) launched its online CPD platform for Kenyan doctors on Friday, September 21, 2018, at the KMPDB Centre, Nairobi. The grand occasion was video-linked live with McMaster University, Hamilton Canada, with Prof. Anthony Levinson and Rosa Kovalski in Ottawa. There was a full house in Nairobi, led by the CEO of KMPDB, Dr. Daniel Yumbya and Chair of the Kenya Medical Association, Dr Jackie Kitulu. All the ten national health regulatory councils and associations were present as we plan on expanding the online CPD platform to other cadres of healthcare workers such as laboratory technicians, nutritionists and clinical officers. Prof. John Adwok, Chair of the South Sudan Medical Council urged AIHT to extend the online CPD service to SS health professionals immediately after the launch.

Mr. Stephen Muthama (Secretary General of the Kenya Clinical Officers Association)

Dr. Anthony Levinson and Ms. Rosa Kovalski was able to join the team via live conferencing.

“The online platforms help enhance learning and change behavior of the user” – Dr. Anythony Levinson (Director, Division of e-Learning Innovation (Machealth) and Associate Professor at McMaster University)

As part of the presentation, AIHT Sagam was able to demonstrate how the platform works in real-time. We wish to thank Dr. Walter Obita, Mr. Duncan Mwai, Mr. Crispus Muthiani and Mr. Isaiah Opondo (together with Ms. Kovalski, Prof. Levinson, Dr. Khama Rogo and Dr. Lucie Rogo) for their support in getting the hub and the launch up and running.


The new online service offers intensive courses written by professionals for professionals and opportunity for thoughtful interaction with peers, both in Kenya, the region and beyond.

To sign up or find out more, please visit the AIHT Sagam website or copying and pasting the following url into your browser: www.aihtsagamhub.com

AIHT Updates

Posted by on Sep 18, 2018 in Recent News | 0 comments

The following AIHT updates were shared with us by courtesy of SCH founder, Professor Khama Rogo.

 

AIHT shares innovations with Zimbabwe

The AIHT experience was recently presented at Victoria Falls during the annual conference of the Association of Health Funders of Zimbabwe (AHFOZ).  The photos below aptly represent the determination of AIHT to share the PP in health experience and innovations with like minded networks across Africa, from Lake Victoria to Victoria Falls!

 

 

AIHT Sagam at the 6th Quadrilinial conference of ECSACON

 

Nearly 1000 nurses from 16 African countries and beyond, recently gathered in Nairobi for the East Central and Southern African college of Nursing (ECSACON) Conference.  All global and regional nursing royalty were there, including the current President (Kennedy from Ireland) and Past President (Judith Sharman from Canada) of International Council of Nurses (ICN), the President of ECSACON (Susan Otieno), and President of JHPIEGO (L. Mancusso).  Near Kiereini, the first and only black president of ICN, former Chief Nursing Officer in Kenya.  They both graced the occasions together hinders of senior nurses from the country and region.

The ‘Nightingale’ procession and candle lighting were events to behold.

Professor Khama Rogo chaired a special two hour stimulating Presidential round table at the plenary before the official opening by Kenya’s Deputy President.   Both Siaya and Kisumu counties were well represented by strong delegations, led by the first lady of Kisumu County, H.E. Dorothy Nyong’o.  Mrs. Nyong’o comes a historically formidable nursing family.  Both, her mother and aunt were pioneer nurses at Kenyatta National Hospital.  AIHT was at hand to attend to accompany the County delegations and display our UBT innovations through the well visited KMET stand. 

The pictures below help to tell the story.

Outreach Returns

Posted by on Sep 17, 2018 in Recent News | 0 comments

After a two-week hiatus SCH’s community outreach program will continue this Wednesday, the 19th, at Ulumbi.  During our outreaches we strive to provide health services to rural areas that may not have the same access that many others have.  We will set up at the church in Ulumbi (near Yala town) and are kindly asking for people or organizations to join us as partners on the day.  If you are interested, please contact Javan Ogoch at 0719893544.  Thank you in advanced.

A photo taken from a past outreach.

September’s Ketamine Week

Posted by on Sep 14, 2018 in Recent News | 0 comments

Every Second Matters for Mothers and Babies Ketamine (ESM-Ketamine)™ Anesthesia Training Program: The training program for this life-saving, award-winning safe anesthesia solution in areas of Kenya with limited access to anesthesia services is housed at the African Institute for Health Transformation (AIHT).  AIHT at Sagam Community Hospital (SCH) was excited to host trainees from Kisumu County for September’s Ketamine Week.  The team from Kombewa (in Kisumu County) consisted of three registered nurses, a Clinical Officer (also trained as an anesthetist) and a medical officer.

The team from Kombewa.

SCH agreed to train this team during a ceremony held  by H.E. Peter Anyang’ Nyongo’ earlier this month in Kisumu which was held to jump start UHC in Kisumu County.

 

This month’s Ketamine week started with a slight hiccup as there were some logistical issues on Monday (the traditional start of Ketamine Week).  Because of that, only one member of the Kombewa team was able to start training then, with the rest all arriving on Tuesday morning.  Despite the shorter week than usual, the trainees got some excellent hands on experience in administering Ketamine.  There were 21 surgeries performed last week including four successful emergency cesarean sections. 

One of the twenty-one surgeries performed during the week.

After a busy week full of lectures, surgeries, a pretest and a posttest, all of the team members from Kombewa were successfully trained as Ketamine providers.  In celebration of this we held our traditional graduation ceremony on Friday evening to conclude another successful Ketamine Week.  In this ceremony we presented the former trainees with their Ketamine certificates, danced, and enjoyed some cake.

We would like the SCH staff for working so hard during this Ketamine Week.  Also thank you to the Kombewa team who were able to come on short notice and were excellent students.   SCH is very proud to have accomplished our goal that we were given earlier last month.  We intend to build on this successful Ketamine Week with more in the future.

The team from Kombewa took a group photo before departing.

Our Team;

Our Facilitators

Javan Imbamba, Clinical Officer, Ketamine Champion (SCH)

Wenslaus Adenya, Clinical Officer, Ketamine Champion (SCH)

Juma Jaqtone, Anaesthetist (SCH)

 

Our surgical staff

Dr. Taha Yusufali, Chief of Surgery (SCH)

Dr. Nyamogo, OB/GYN consultant and Assistant Team Leader for the ESM-Ketamine Project

Lucy Atieno, Surgical Tech

Samuel Orondo, Surgical Registered Nurse

Kashmir Owino, Surgical Tech

Grace Sawanda, Surgical Nurse

 

Additional staff members;

Debora Rogo, General Manager

Juddy Odhiambo, Administrative Manager

Leslie Ojeaburu, Program Coordinator

Phoebe Kelleher, Program Coordinator

Sebastian Karlson, Assistant Program Coordinator

Dr. Solomon Orero, Team Leader for the ESM-Ketamine Project

 

For more information on AIHT please visit our website by clicking here.

 

This article was written by Sebastian Karlson.

 

Outreach at Ugunja

Posted by on Sep 6, 2018 in Recent News | 0 comments

Everyone is aware that some days can get off to a rough start, but it’s important to not let that dictate how the rest of your day goes.  Last Wednesday the SCH outreach team had a bit of rough start in the morning when our ambulance got stuck on the side of the road right in front of the hospital.  It put the team a bit behind schedule but knowing that we had patients waiting on us in Ugunja, our main driver, Fred Owino, promptly towed the ambulance out and we were soon on our way.

The ambulance stuck on the side of the road.

Last week’s outreach was special for several reasons.  Firstly, we were joined by a team from Metronics, one of our spongsors that help make outreach a possibility.  Secondly it was Elizabeth Ogada’s (our Matron) last ever outreach.  You can read more about her by clicking here.  In addition to both of those things we were also joined by Kathy Tate-Bradish, a Rotarian from Evanston Lighthouse Rotary Club.

Elizabeth Ogada, our Matron, with Molly, a team member from Metronics, on her last outreach.

Despite the morning’s delays we arrived to Ugunja at around 10:00 AM and found a place that we could park our trailer before swiftly setting up to make up for lost time. 

Our set up right before we started to see patients.

Some curious children checking out what we’re dong.

Although we had a bit of a stuttered start in the morning the rest of the day went rather well for our outreach team.  We were fully prepped and seeing patients by 10:15 AM.  Throughout the day we were able to register 151 new patients.  110 of them were screened for high blood pressure while 49 more were tested for HIV.  12 patients received family planning services while 20 women were screened for cervical cancer.  52 patients were also seen personally by a nurse and we even referred one patient back to SCH to receive surgery for free during this week’s Ketamine week.

The visiting team from Metronics that joined us on our outreach.

A patient having her blood pressure tested.

A big shout out to the Metronics for helping out with this week’s community outreach.  Also, a huge thank you to Matron for all her countless contributions on outreach days, it will be difficult to find another outreach leader like her.  We would also like to thank the rest of our sponsors that help make days like this feasible (Jhpeigo, Mtiba, HHA, KMET, Odit, Esslor).

 

This article was written by Sebastian Karlson

Humans of SCH; Elizabeth (Matron)

Posted by on Sep 5, 2018 in Recent News | 0 comments

“Nurses are the heart of healthcare” – Donna Wilk Cardill

The sun has barely peeked out from behind the horizon as Elizabeth brushes her hands down her blue and white nursing uniform. She exits her home and makes her way down the long winding path leading to Sagam Community Hospital. She stops only to wave and talk to neighbors she has known for years.

Maybe it is her warm smile or her soft yet firm voice, but from the moment you talk to Elizabeth Ogada, you feel the comfort and care that only a good nurse can provide. Elizabeth, or Matron as she is called by the hospital staff, has had plenty of practice in this role – nearly 30 years to be exact. Currently she serves as Sagam Community Hospital’s head nursing director, helping to coordinate nursing services within the hospital and to ensure the cleanliness of the facilities.

“I was born right here in County,” (a subcounty of Siaya County) Matron tells me. Her eyes peering out over her low hanging glasses. Her hands rest gently on the desk in her office at the top of SCH. “This is my home – where I grew up”. I ask her about her family and she laughs. This is the same jovial laugh I have heard through the halls of Sagam in the morning while Matron checks in on the nurses in the wards.

 “I was the oldest of eight children,” she continues. “From the start I have always been the role model in the family. The one everyone looks up to and the one who was responsible for making sure all the house work gets done”.  This sounds almost exactly like the role of a matron – to be a role model to all of the nursing staff and to make sure essential nursing and sanitation activities run smoothly. I point this out to Matron and she laughs again. “I really didn’t connect it until now but that is what I have been doing all along, since childhood”.

Matron has wanted to be a nurse since standard E6 when she got sick and was cared for by several nurses in her local hospital. After she finished school, she enrolled in nursing school and received her nursing certificate. Later she would go back for her nursing diploma. For Matron, the hardest and most important part of being a diploma nurse is the critical thinking that is essential in every patient interaction. “You have to ask why you are doing things and sometimes you find yourself rubbing shoulders with others because you want to have more information”.

After nursing school, Matron rose through the ranks. She served as a registered community health nurse, then as a nursing officer in charge of the wards, before being promoted to a senior nursing officer in charge of many hospitals in  the sub county she was working in at the time. Eventually she made her way back home to Gem, where she took on her current role at Sagam.

Being a nurse has changed Matron in many ways. Initially a very shy person, she has learned to build interpersonal relationships with her other nurses and patients. As a leader in the hospital, she has learned how to motivate her staff and evaluate their performance. She has developed a keen eye for identifying personal difficulties her nurses might face that negatively impact their work and has learned to handle those challenges in a caring and discreet manner.

During her time at Sagam, Matron has been essential in separating the role of the sanitation staff and the nursing staff. She has also been an active leader of the outreach team. With her guidance, SCH outreach has grown from just seeing a few patients every Wednesday, to caring for more than a hundred members of the local communities each week.

“The first time we started outreaches, we would just go somewhere and take outreaches there. But nobody would turn up. Eventually we talked to our community health volunteers and told them that each of them should invite outreaches to their homes. So, when we went to those locations for outreach we would find that these volunteers have mobilized people.” Matron continues, leaning back in her chair.  “Through the family planning and the health screens at outreaches, I have seen women who thought they were sterile, give birth to children. We have managed to bring others who can’t afford care for our ketamine weeks.” It is clear that Matron takes great pride in Sagam Community Hospital and its dedication to communities around Siaya County. There is a lot to be proud of. In 2018, the SCH outreach team has already seen 2393 patients, given blood pressure screens for 2093 people, and seen over 800 patients for family planning services. All of this has been possible because of Matron’s leadership and that of the other members of the team.

Matron smiles during her last community outreach in Ugunja.

We at Sagam Community Hospital thank Elizabeth “Matron” Ogada for her hard work and dedication to the Sagam community.

This article was written by Leslie Ojeaburu

Sagam’s Reproductive Health Talk

Posted by on Aug 28, 2018 in Recent News | 0 comments

At 12 pm, Friday, August 24th the AIHT classroom was filled with over 80 young women from around the community. This was the third installment of Sagam’s reproductive health talks. This talk, however, was unique. Not only would this event be led by a female sex educator from KMET, but the group would also be joined by the Siaya County Woman’s representative and members of the Sagam Rotary Club.

The first girls to arrive came at around 1pm.

The event started with a demonstration from Cecilia, one of the outreach nurses, on how to use the sanitary pads donated by Skylark. This was followed by a presentation from Caroline Nendez, an educator on sexual reproductive health interventions. Caroline will be joining the outreach team in the coming months as they reach out to young girls in the community. She was an engaging speaker, interacting with the crowd of teenagers to young adults like an older, knowledgeable sister. She showed the girls various forms of contraception and birth control – highlighting the benefits and downsides associated with each intervention. In addition, she led a fascinating demonstration on the proper use of male and female condoms. Many in the crowd, both young and old, had never seen a female condom before and found her presentation to be truly eye opening. This demonstration, coupled with the free condom’s available through the Comprehensive Care Clinic at Sagam Community Hospital, will be crucial in preventing under-aged pregnancies.

Cecilia, a nurse from SCH, was the first speaker of the afternoon.

Caroline Nendez, from KMET, then followed with another excellent presentation.

The girls then had the opportunity to ask questions. Many of these young women were truly looking to understand and engage with the material. One girl asked about the effectiveness of each type of contraception at stopping pregnancy. Caroline answered in stride, categorizing contraception into the natural methods and therapeutic/mechanical methods. She highlighted the downsides of natural methods like withdrawal or calendar tracking, noting that extra vigilance and partner cooperation is needed for these to be effective.

Before any other questions could be asked, Christine Ombaka, the Women’s Representative of Siaya county entered the room. She was accompanied by Otieno Siguru (MCA of Gem Sub-county), members of the rotary club, and Dr. Khama Rogo (Sagam’s founder). After introductions, Dr. Rogo gave a brief address reminding the girls that they play an integral role in the future of Sagam community. He encouraged those present to strive for greater civic and community engagement. After this address, Elizabeth Ogada, Sagam’s matron gave a brief presentation on the Sagam outreach team. This was followed by a brief introduction on the origins and accomplishments of the Reproductive Health Talks by Javan Ogoch. The MCA of Gem sub-county also briefly highlighted how proud he was of the Sagam Outreach Team – noting the importance of continued community support for Sagam’s young women.

Christine Ombaka, during her speech in the AIHT classroom.

Christine Ombaka then took the stage. A previous visitor of Sagam, Ms. Ombaka commended the hospital for interacting closely with the local community and for driving cervical cancer and HIV screening around Siaya county. She also offered her knowledge and experience as a teacher and video producer to help with future reproductive health talks. Finally, Christine Ombaka summarized the various initiatives around Siaya that she has played an integral role in creating. Most relevant was the new legislature that limits marriages to individuals above the age of 18. This law helps to protect under-aged pregnant mothers from forced marriages, allowing many to finish their education. Finally, she encouraged the girls to join community groups and to continue offering ideas for community improvement. With those final remarks, the third Reproductive Health Talks ended with refreshments and mandazi.

The girls enjoy some soda before departing.

Sagam Hospital sincerely thanks Christine Ombaka, Otieno Siguru, and Caroline Nendez from KMET for taking part in this important outreach effort. We look forward to continued partnership with the Siaya County government, Skylark, and KMET to drive improved sex education within Gem sub-county.

 

 

Kisumu County Launches UHC

Posted by on Aug 27, 2018 in Recent News | 0 comments

A day long ceremony attracted a large crowd of over 4000 at Diemo Primary School earlier this August on the 9th.  The event was held as part of the National United Healthcare program (UHC). The National UHC is aimed at ensuring universal healthcare for all citizens of Kenya. This is also one of President Kenyatta’s ‘big four’ priority programs that he said the government would prioritize in 2018 during his reelection speech.  The other programs include food security, affordable housing, and manufacturing.

His Excellency, Governor Peter Anyang’ Nyong’o of Kisumu led the ceremony along with the county cabinet and legislators. During the day, the Nation Hospital Insurance fund (NHIF) introduced their brand-new registration process with the help of Mbita technology, Pharmaccess Foundation, and Safaricom.  Together they registered over 5000 households in only 5 days!  The governor and his team also paid a visit to Kombewa Sub-County Hospital, which will  be the service delivery hub in the area.  The hospital’s OR is still under construction and many gaps were identified when evaluating the services the hospital could be expected to provide.  Among the largest problems discussed were the lack of emergency and surgical services. 

Currently, the hospital does not have an anesthetist available, so a temporary solution was identified involving Sagam Community Hospital.  SCH agreed to help establish surgical care at the facility within four weeks.  In addition, SCH was tasked with identifying an interim space within the hospital to serve as an operating room.  SCH also intends to train Kombewa Sub-County Hospital staff members during the next ESM-Ketamine training week and will continue to coach the onsite resident doctor on basic surgeries, including cesarean section.

SCH is excited about this collaboration with Kombewa and looks forward to training Kombewa’s staff members in administering Ketamine during the first week of September. 

This is a giant step for both SCH and ESM-Ketamine.

This article was written by Sebastian Karlson

Strong Child Nurturing for Strong Communities – A Visit from Two Strangers

Posted by on Aug 27, 2018 in Recent News | 0 comments

On August 22, two strangers stood outside the Sagam Community Hospital (SCH) outpatient clinic. The clipboard in their hands, watchful gaze, and bright yellow letters on their polo t-shirts spelling KMET instantly told anyone watching that these men were hard at work. Their names were Tobias Oketch and Richard Miruka. They are part of KMET’s “Quality Assurance Data for Nurturing Care” study focused on implementing Early Childhood Development in Siaya County in public and private hospitals. Although they were at SCH to observe the quality of clinician record keeping, their larger study had broad impacts on community health in Sagam.

“We believe it is important to carefully observe every child’s developmental milestones to ensure the child is developing appropriate social and emotional coping mechanisms,” Tobias explained, leaning against the outer wall of the hospital.

Richard continued, “Even observing a child’s play can tell you a lot about their growth. We think it is important that this information is being well recorded by clinicians and communicated to parents”.

Richard, Tobias, and the rest of the nurturing care team follow what they term the five pillars of early child development:

  • Adequate Nutrition
  • Opportunities for Early Learning
  • Safety and Security
  • Good Health
  • Responsive Caregiving

This is a framework that international health agencies like the WHO, UNICEF, and the World Bank have worked to develop. Recently on May 23, 2018, an international statement was released highlighting efforts to establish a standardized metric for evaluating early child development programs. A joint statement released by the WHO, UNICEF, and the World Bank, notes the early plasticity of a child’s brain from pregnancy to age 3 as a major reason to focus on those five key pillars. The framework goes on to highlight how these factors are essential to the future health of a community’s younger generations. In this international report, Siaya County was mentioned as a county working to develop health bills that promote nurturing care as a key intervention in public hospitals. Government partnerships with private organizations like KMET, help to ensure that the recording keeping infrastructure is in place to successfully implement and evaluate these interventions.

SCH is committed to fulfilling the targets towards instilling Early Childhood Development and ensuring a better future for Siaya’s children.

For further information on the international Nurturing Care framework, you can read the report. Also included is a brief newsletter highlighting the efforts Siaya County has taken to establish this program in its local communities.

This article was written by Leslie Ojeaburu

Humans of SCH; Ken

Posted by on Aug 22, 2018 in Recent News | 0 comments

A pharmaceutical technician by trade, Kenneth Otieno Oginga (or Ken as he’s commonly known), works as a pharm tech here at Sagam Community Hospital (SCH ).  Always seen with a huge smile on his face, it is very apparent that he genuinely loves what he does.  Every day, as soon as he arrives in the morning, he cleans and dusts the pharmacy making sure his workspace is pristine. After a brief prayer,  he starts filling the prescription orders that have been placed, taking care to prep drugs that will be needed for surgery.  However, his favourite part of his job, has and always will be, speaking with patients. 

Ken is always seen with a huge smile on his face.

Ken decided to pursue a career in medicine after he lost his father when he was still in Form One.  After his loss, he wanted to understand of how medicine affects the human body. Above all, he had a deep desire to help others.  This deep passion pushed him to dedicate the past eight years of his life to medicine.  He is grateful that SCH gave him the opportunity to work in Sagam straight out of college and because of this he “always gives his level best” while he works.

One of Ken’s biggest goals is to leave the SCH pharmacy better than when he found it.  When he arrived at Sagam, a little over three years ago, the pharmacy was attending to only 40 out patient clients  monthly.  Now the pharmacy caters to over 400  in the Sagam area every month.  Not only has Ken been vital in equipping the pharmacy to manage the growing influx of patients but he has also been essential in creating the pharmacy’s ever-growing inventory.  Upon his arrival, the pharmacy only had  access to the most basic drugs, but now they carry some of the best medications available.  In the future, Ken would like to see another pharmacy added to the hospital.  The second pharmacy would be entirely dedicated to the ever-growing outpatient clients we have here so the whole department would run much smoother. 

Apart from his life at the hospital , Ken also has a passion for football.  He supports Arsenal of England and watches them at every opportunity he can.  He isn’t just an avid football fan,  but a player himself.  In fact, he captains the Sagam Hospital’s football team and is currently the team’s top scorer.  Above all though, Ken is a family man.  When he isn’t giving his best at work or scoring hattricks on the pitch, he spends as much time with his wife and kids as possible.

SCH would like to say a big thank you to Ken for his massive contributions to the Hospital.

This article was written by Sebastian Karlson